Design /

Design That Inspires:
Love

JB-32

When an opportunity came up to shoot their engagement photos at the Herman Miller Showroom in LA, Justine and Brendon Breen jumped at it. The result? Unique engagement photos that celebrate their love for each other and beautiful design.

Mid-Century Modern Romance

Stepping out of what he describes as a circa 1920s concrete block with bad cell service (not every building is a winner), Brendon Breen explained his love of mid-century design, how he met his wife, Justine, and how they came to take their engagement photos in a Herman Miller Showroom in LA that tvsdesign just happened to design.

1015

I always wanted an Eames Lounge. I spent my entire first tax return on it.

Justine and Brendon live in the San Diego where Brendon has been an interior designer for the U.S. Navy for the past nine years. The Breens are both mid-century modern enthusiasts; they live in an A. Quincy Jones house in Oceanside, Ca., furnished with classics like the Eames Lounge and Compact Sofa, that’s well-documented on its own Instagram account @thebreenhaus.

thebreenhaus

Between their mutual love of Herman Miller pieces and his connections in the design world, they were able to reserve the Herman Miller Showroom in L.A. during a Saturday for their photo session. And the space is truly a unique, located in a former warehouse building with bowstring wooden trusses, concrete walls and garden courtyard — none of that usual rustic barn, vintage bridge or field of long prairie grass we so commonly see in engagement photos here. For Brendon and Justine, shooting their photos with a backdrop that’s both beautiful and connected to something they love just made sense.

1012

It’s shocking how well it’s done, and the overall beauty of how it’s laid out and flows from indoor to outdoor.

So while we can tell you how many square feet the showroom is, about the curved walls that guide spatial flow, how it was the first LEED CI Platinum space in L.A., or about the adjustable accent lighting, when it comes to how it’s used post-completion? That’s a little less predictable.